Distance Learning

Distance learning has come a long, long way.

As schools around the world embrace the concept of distance learning, it’s only natural that they start looking for furniture expressly created to enhance this unique learning environment. Of great importance in a distance learning lab is providing unobstructed sight lines between the students and video screen. In a small lab, a tabletop that flares toward the screen gives the students the ability to both take notes and see the lecturer.

Matching distance learning furniture and the distance learning lab.

The most effective distance learning labs are designed around the students. As mentioned earlier, a small distance learning lab designed to accommodate four to five students can make use of a Smith System “half boat” table with a large video monitor. The half-boat design works well for distance learning furniture because it provides good sightlines and ample workspace.

If a large group of students must be accommodated, the lab can assume some of the characteristics of a lecture room, again maintaining unobstructed sight lines. Smith System offers many great choices in student desking.  Whether large or small, distance learning labs are increasingly finding the value of connectivity. For this, the Smith System I~0™ Post is indispensible.

Evaluating seating as distance learning school furniture.

In a small distance learning lab, where students are stationed around a table that’s directed at a video monitor, it helps the students concentrate if they can comfortably face the front at a bit of an angle without moving their chairs. Smith System Flavors™ Seating and Plato™ Seating both work well in this situation. Additionally, an adjustable chair from any of our lines would also allow this shift in orientation, as would our mobile chairs.

To furnish larger distance learning labs, educators have the same options as above and may want to seriously consider the Intuit™ Chair, for the comfort and support it provides and for its ability to gently direct the student’s attention toward the front.

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